A life less ordinary Examines a New Definition of “Home”

Some aspects of our new normal are quite practical, for example the exhibition “A Life Less Ordinary”. The shop window starts in the Mia Karlova Gallery and can be viewed digitally as part of the Collectible Salon, the Brussels Fair’s online platform, from May 28th to 30th, and in person in the new gallery space in Amsterdam from May 28th to July 23rd become. Fittingly, the show explores the changes our habits and environments have seen over the past year through the work of four international designers – Vadim Kibardin, Femke van Gemert, Olga Engel and Sho Ota – and the focus on “home”.

“During self-isolation, some felt abandoned because they were separated from loved ones, while others, constantly surrounded by people, desperately sought privacy. We stayed home, stopped traveling, went online and watched things we hadn’t noticed before. This change in focus has changed our perception of ordinary life. Karlova continued, “I wanted the pieces I picked for the show to address these life changing changes and I hope that living a less ordinary life will help develop a thought process around these issues by removing the The boundaries of art and design are being pushed. “

Black mirror chair, Vadim Kibardin

If you’ve placed more Amazon orders than usual in the past year, you are not alone. For many, online shopping was the only means of obtaining material necessities. With his “Black Paper” collection, Vadim Kibardin examines a conscious and responsible approach to consumption by using large quantities of discarded cardboard boxes. With its sculptural, fully functional Black Mirror and Dolly chairs, Vadim offers an idea for a circular economy.

sculptural chair

Dolly Chair, Vadim Kibardin

Detail of the sculptural chair

Dolly Chair, Vadim Kibardin

Textile art

Conflict Forces, Femke van Gemert

Another topic of our time – fast fashion. Looking down more and more often, it’s still a nuisance for the industry. Femke van Gemert, with a background in fashion design and trendsetter, has noticed the increase in consumption. Their observations led to exploring ways to turn unused textiles into art. van Gemert’s practice breathes new life into textile scraps with their personal touch.

Showcase

Lightbox No. 1L, Olga Engel

Olga Engel is known for her minimalist shapes and designs and Lightbox # 1L was designed for the present. Where home has become the center of our lives. What looks like a familiar piece of furniture at first glance changes when it is embedded in unexpected functions. Spaces have been created for social interaction and privacy, while aged glass enhances the atmosphere inside. A door opens so that a sculpture or object can be placed inside. A low table can be a place for books or coffee, while the lighting element brings them all together.

Showcase

Lightbox No. 1L, Olga Engel

sculptural side table

Underground side table, Sho Ota

Home is also at the heart of Sho Ota’s research, which focuses on the shapes and textures that surround us. His ‘Surfaced’ collection reveals the structures beneath industrial surfaces. For example, the cloakroom in the collection shows the viewer the structure of the wood and transforms an ordinary piece of furniture into a functional sculpture. The final shape appears throughout the manufacturing process and also depends on the wood as its appearance and texture can vary, making each piece unique. Sho’s underground table conveys a similar presence and reflects the light from its surroundings.

Coat rack

Surface of the wardrobe, Sho Ota

Coat rack

Surface of the wardrobe, Sho Ota

From May 29th to July 23rd, Mia Karlova Gallery will showcase an unusual life with a preview from May 27th to 28th. Or visit the Collectible Salon digitally from May 28th to 30th.

Mia Karlova Gallery
Prinsengracht 510
Amsterdam 1017 CZK

Styling by Cleo Scheulderman.
Photography by Jeroen van der Spek.

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